Panono the Spherical Camera Can Take Full Circle Images

Panono, Technology, Gadget, Future, CameraNow you can shoot 360 degree pictures by just throwing a camera into the air. This is made possible by Panono, a  device made of 36 cameras embedded within a hardened ball, pointing in every direction. To take a photograph, the photographer will have to toss it into air and each of the cameras click a picture when the ball reaches the maximum height. The images are then uploaded via the photographer’s smartphone to the servers at the Panono company, where they are stitched to make a 360 degree images

How Panono works

The mechanism of the device is very simple. The user tosses the ball camera into the air and the accelerometer located within the camera automatically measures launch acceleration and calculates the moment when it is at the highest point and almost not moving. All the 36 cameras take photographs at that moment and an image is captured, with a 360 degree view.

There is no need for the Panono photographer to go home and laboriously stitch together a cluster of single images on a computer to view the panoramas. The company has launched a free Panono app, which enables the photographer to see the images immediately and you can view your clicked images by moving the smartphone camera up and around just like if you are inside the picture. Since this is all 108 megapixel images, it is possible to view every element in beautiful detail, including things which you did not see when the picture was taken.

Crowd funding

Panono has already collected $1.229 million through a crowdfunding campaign. According to Jonas Pfeil, the founder of Panono, the idea for the product came to him when he was studying in New Zealand and took off on a short trip to Tonga, where he took a number of stationary panoramic pictures, but he wanted to take photographs of any moving object, which was impossible to do at that time.

The Panono has a 108 megapixels resolution and is capable of clicking pictures with a high dynamic range, or the presence of both shadowy and well-lit features in one frame. According to Pfeil, the stitching of the images can be done in the cloud – it is possible to do this in the phone itself, but it will swiftly drain the battery.

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