Scientists Discover how to Mimic the Natural Process of Photosynthesis

Scientists at the University of Central Florida (UCF) have reportedly came up with synthetic material that mimics the natural process of photosynthesis, turning visible light from the sun into solar fuels, eliminating harmful carbon dioxide out of the air in the process. This ability is a potential game changer in environmental and green energy research.  

Assistant professor Fernando Uribe-Romo explained, "This work is a breakthrough… Tailoring materials that will absorb a specific color of light is very difficult from the scientific point of view, but from the societal point of view we are contributing to the development of a technology that can help reduce greenhouse gases."

"The idea would be to set up stations that capture large amounts of CO2, like next to a power plant," says Uribe-Romo. "The gas would be sucked into the station, go through the process and recycle the greenhouse gases while producing energy that would be put back into the power plant."

There are several possible implications from the discovery. It has the potential to become at least a partial solution to the climate change and global warming problem. “The idea would be to set up stations that capture large amounts of CO2, like next to a power plant. The gas would be sucked into the station, go through the process and recycle the greenhouse gases while producing energy that would be put back into the power plant.”

On the official UCF websites team raised the idea of homeowners purchasing rooftop shingles made of the material, which would clean the air in their neighborhood while producing energy that could be used to power their homes.

“That would take new technology and infrastructure to happen,” Uribe-Romo said. “But it may be possible.”

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