The South San Francisco Police Department Sends out Scam Warnings

San Francisco, Bay Area, Tax Scam, PoliceThe police department of South San Francisco is sending out public warnings relating to a scam wherein the fraudsters are taking on the pretense of being IRS agents and are making unsuspecting citizens to pay them money.

According to police reports, the subjects involved in the scam make the victims believe that they are liable to pay huge amount of funds as taxes and that they will be arrested if the funds are not paid in time. In fact, a victim recently believed these scammers and offered to pay 800 dollars via a debit card.

String of scams in Bay Area

The local police and legal authorities in the Bay area are making consistent efforts to warn people about the string of unending scams devisedto extract money from local people. With respect to new versions of a previous scam, the authorities at Marin County are warning the residents of the area about something termed as the “jury phone scam.”

The officials of the Sheriff reported that in this scam, the residents of Marin County have been receiving phone calls from an individual who pretends to be an official from the department of the Sheriff. The caller tells the person receiving the call that he/she has not reported for jury duty, which makes him/her liable to have a warrant for arrest issued against him/her.

In addition to this, the caller also informs the phone call receiver that he/she would have to pay a bail amount or fee to escape arrest. Although none of the residents in Marin County have yet been victims of this scam, the investigators at the Sheriff’s department have been collecting reports about such calls from the county residents in the last few weeks.

Similar scams in San Mateo

A similar attempt to scam people was recently made in San Mateo where several other scams were also being investigated by the police during the entire spring. Warnings to the residents of the city are being given the police with regard to the multiple scams consistently.

One of the scams involves a person calling and pretending to be a law-enforcement authority representative. He claims that a warrant for arrest or a fine has been issued for the person with regards to operating a red-light camera.

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